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Highlights

Permanent work within the museum

The artworks on permanent display in Museum Voorlinden cannot be described, one must undergo them.

 

 

 

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Through the Wall

Whereas a wall typically poses an impenetrable barrier, Through the Wall instead offers an entryway into an endless secret passage. In this 4.5 metres high and 9 metres long installation, Chinese artist Song Dong (1966) lends a new dimension to the concept of ‘wall’. Upon entering the work, the kaleidoscopic, reflecting interior unfolds itself.

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Skyspace

James Turrell designed a Skyspace especially for Museum Voorlinden. It consists of a space with a square hole in the roof, through which the viewer looks directly upwards and sees the air as never before.

In creating this Skyspace, Turrell created a program of light, which factors in the dusk in Wassenaar. The soft natural light is in contrast with the bright, almost palpable colours of the lamps of the Skyspace. The effect is breathtaking.

In the case of rain or snow the Skyspace will be temporarily closed to prevent slipping.

Ron Mueck

Stand eye to eye with Couple under an Umbrella by Ron Mueck.

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Leandro Erlich’s Swimming Pool is specially designed for Voorlinden.

Roni Horn

Wander past the magical sculptures by Roni Horn.

Highlights

Open Ended

The sculpture Open Ended by the American artist Richard Serra weighs almost 216 tonnes. The corten steel work is 4 metres high, 18 metres long and 7 metres wide.

This is a piece full of contrasts: both heavy and elegant, industrial and organic, stately and playful, convex and concave. Six vaulted steel plates moulded together form a maze. Open Ended is a work best experienced by walking through it.

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Maurizio Cattelan

The museum has in built-in elevator that comes up just a little bit higher than a grown-up’s ankle, on a scale of 1:7,5. The lift cabin disappears to an unknown destination in a building that does not have any storeys. Cattelan plays a game of copying and scaling, which allows the spectator to look at reality from a different point of view. The moment of recognition is immediately followed by the feeling of alienation, which is exactly what the artist is aiming for.